July 08, 2006

July 8, 2006: Free for 2 months ... & Control

Telus Mobility said yesterday it will start offering XM's satellite-radio service to its wireless telephone customers. Mark Evans, Financial Post, July 07, 20
www.canada.com/nationalpost/financialpost/
story.html?id=72a0eda0-3066-4642-a130-b5ee58005ee8


Telus Mobility said yesterday it will start offering XM's satellite-radio service to its wireless telephone customers. The service will feature 20 commercial-free channels. It will be offered for free for the first two months, and initially be available on two wireless phones, the LG 8100 and Samsung A950. [....]


Remember, you shouldn't use wireless phones in a thunder storms. Check that as I may have mis-remembered something important.


No, thanks ... no competition in this ... CRTC has too much control ... the language industry ... the multicult industry ... and check for others who would get in on the control ... car ... household appliances ... and what else?

Canada on satellite radio radar P.J. Harston, Business Editor, The London Free Press, September 9, 2005
www.fyilondon.com/cgi-bin/publish.cgi?x=articles&s=shopping&p=104298


Satellite radio, which has been around for more than two years in the U.S., consists of about 120 stations from two companies -- Sirius and XM -- that are beamed directly into car or home devices, many of which plug directly into existing sound systems.

[....] The "radio" is really a receiver with a miniature display screen upon which information, such as the song title and the artist's name, is displayed.

When Canadian satellite radio starts up, about 100 channels will be available from each of two companies that will broadcast to about 90 per cent of Canada's land mass: Sirius Canada and Canadian Satellite Radio Inc. (partly owned by XM). CHUM Inc. is offering a 50-channel land-based digital radio product that will be for urban markets only.

While licences have been issued to all three companies by the CRTC, subscriptions have yet to be sold and the federal government is already mulling whether to review the licences.


Why does a broadcaster need a licence controlled by someone else in a world of the ability to podcast your own program? Am I missing something big? Is it the grasp of those who would control us? ... Or my own inadequate knowledge?

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