January 28, 2007

Jan. 28, 2007: Selflessly doing good

Note: Double click the screen captures to see them enlarged-- then "back" to return.

Update: Jan. 29, 2007

Canadian taxpayers might be interested in how money is spent for the good of Russians and their judicial system, particularly the part about taxes. Considering the negative comments about the laxity of Canadian courts and the underfunding of our security services for the protection of all Canadians, considering the tax implications of the income trusts and whatever was going on there, a look at how money was being spent to help the Russian judicial system--necessitating travel and much lawerly cogitation at meetings--seemed of interest, perhaps because Jean Chretien had or has been involved in consulting in Russia, something about the oil company Yukos, I believe.


The Commisioner for Federal Judicial Affairs

OTTAWA, November 8, 2001 - The Honourable Anne McLellan, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, after consultation with the Canadian Judicial Council, today announced the appointment of David Gourdeau as Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs. He replaces Guy Goulard, Q.C. who retired last year. -- or here

canada2.just
ice.gc.ca/en/news/ja/
2001/doc_27860.html

Mr. Gourdeau received a Bachelor of Laws from Université Laval in 1976 and, following his call to the Bar of Quebec in 1977.... In 1995, Mr. Gourdeau became a member of the former Canada Labour Relations Board and has continued his participation with the Canada Industrial Relations Board since that time.


End of Update





The following explores examples of only three directions in which Canadian taxpayers' funding goes, but I found them instructive:

* Participation of the Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs in Judicial Co-operation Projects [Ethiopia , Ukraine , Russia - model courts and future training centres , Kaluga, Kursk and Voronezh]

* Global Governance? Deep Integration Planned at Secret Conference [Centre for International Governance Innovation , CIGI , Canadian based North American Forum on Integration , North American parliament , Raymond Chretien , CIDA / CIGI is part of the Igloo Network]

* Joe Clark speaks to ... or is it for ... CIGI? [Centre for International Governance Innovation's annual conference in Waterloo , Joe Clark interview , Africa , Newfoundland and Labrador's Conservative MP Loyola Hearn on Joe Clark -- Note: The Joe Clark interview was extremely difficult to find until you know it exists.]



Selfless Canadians: Doing good globally ... in every direction ... with help from the usual funding source ... This is an attempt to reveal where some of the money goes.

An example from a 2005 webpage.








Note in the second screen capture, in case you might miss it, there are two links for language training. Did this have anything to do with the former languages tzar's [Dyane Adam's] visit to Asia? What was the purpose of that visit? Keep digging.

Source: index

www.fja.g
c.ca/Inter_coop/in
dex_e.html

This is only one example:

Russia

www.fja.g
c.ca/Inter_co
op/russia_e.html

In the fall of 1997, the Office was mandated to develop and deliver a two week program under the auspices of the Yeltsin Foundation for two delegations of Russian Constitutional Court judges and a delegation of Arbitrage Court judges headed by the Chairman of the High Arbitrage Court, Professor Yakovlev. These missions of high ranking Russian Judicial officials led to a request for a multi-year Russia/Canada Judicial Cooperation Project. On December 10, 1999, a Memorandum of Agreement was signed in Moscow, formally launching a four year, $3.4 million Russia/Canada Judicial Partnership Program.

This program partners the OCFJA with the three highest judicial bodies of the Russian Federation: the Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation, the Supreme Court of the Russian Federation and the Supreme Arbitration Court of the Russian Federation.

The program consists of three separate components; one under the authority of each of the high courts of the Russian Federation. Under the Supreme Court and the participation of the Russian Judicial Department, three model courts and future training centres have been established at the Raion court level in Kaluga, Kursk and Voronezh. With the Russian Constitutional Court, round-table discussions will take place both in Russia and Canada [....]

.... the program will develop new court procedures for an open, fair, and efficient resolution of tax disputes.

... based on the similarities of the Canadian and the Russian federal systems ....

In January 2000, ... First Steering Committee Meeting in Ottawa. ... round-table discussions ... April 2000. In May of 2000, .... Second Steering Committee Meeting was held in Moscow in November 2000 and the third one in Montreal, Canada in November 2001.


Was it not Jean Chretien who was consulting with Pres. Putin over Yukos and its tax problems? This program began in 1997. Check further.



Memory Lane:
Sept. 26, 2006: Global Governance?

Deep Integration Planned at Secret Conference


The Centre for International Governance Innovation / Centre pour l'innovation dans la gouvernance internationale (CIGI) is located in Waterloo, Ontario, where it was founded in 2002.

N. American students trained for 'merger' -- 10 universities participate in 'model Parliament' in Mexico to simulate 'integration' of 3 nations

[....] Under the sponsorship of the Canadian based North American Forum on Integration, students met in the Mexican Senate for five days in May in an event dubbed "Triumvirate," with organizers declaring "A North American Parliament is born."

A similar event took place in the Canadian Senate in 2005.

The intentions of organizers are clear.

"The creation of a North American parliament, such as the one being simulated by these young people, should be considered," explained Raymond Chretien, the president of the Triumvirate and the former Canadian ambassador to both Mexico and the U.S.

[....] Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI)

[....] CIGI Building Ideas for Global Change (tm)

CIDA ‘s Canada Corps and CIGI partner

CIDA joins CIGI’s Innovation Network to promote public engagement in democratic development using IGLOO technology.

[....] CIDA/CIGI is part of the Igloo Network.



There was mention of this somewhere, related to the Banff meeting: www.fina-nafi.org at the Banff Springs Hotel.




Memory Lane: Joe Clark speaks to ... or is it for ... CIGI? , Sept. 2006

CIGI: Joe Clark shows his leftist and Liberal bona fides

Joe Clark Embassy [Embassy Magazine is not produced by an embassy] Sept. 20, 2006 by Lee Berthiaume, Waterloo

Q & A: Joe Clark and Berthiaume.

Error Not Sign of Weakness: Former PM Clark , Embassy [Magazine], September 20th, 2006, Q & A, By Lee Berthiaume, Waterloo -- or Yahoo cached copy


Yahoo search: "Error Not Sign of Weakness, embassy"
This still worked Jan. 27, 2007.


www.embas
symag.ca/html/ind
ex.php?dis
play=story&full_pa
th=/2006/sep
tember/20/jclark

Every time I tried to post this one, it was changed or corrupted. Strange, because it did work. Must be an election coming up. Makes things wonky.

66.218.69
.11/search/cache?p=
Joe+Clark%2C+embas
sy+&
fr=yfp-t-501&
toggle=
1&ei=
UTF-8&u=
www.embas
symag.ca/html/
index.php%3Fdisplay%3D
story%26full_path%3D/2006/
september/20/jclark/&w
=joe+clark+embas
sy&d
=c2ibV-xsOJB
X&icp=
1&.intl=us



This is a funny beginning, given that Mr. Clark was a speaker at CIGI and that Mr. Berthiaume's articles are featured on CIGI which is, like so many of these groups, stuffed with Liberals such as appointee Louise Frechette, late of the UN (and who had some connection to UNSCAM, according to an earlier post, this week), other Liberal appointees and their network of those who did not like the Conservative merger and who often, also, fall into cushy places and positions.

Embassy caught up with Mr. Clark, who also served as foreign affairs minister under Brian Mulroney, at the Centre for International Governance Innovation's annual conference in Waterloo last weekend to discuss his thoughts on the foreign policy being followed by Mr. Harper's government. The following is an edited transcript of that conversation.

What do you think of the current government's foreign policy?

I think that an effective Canadian foreign policy has to balance two preoccupations. One is working very closely with the U.S. The other is pursuing an independent policy in the world. [....]

This is a new government. It is a government that doesn't have a lot of international experience. Given your experiences when you were prime minister, what lessons did you have to learn and that this government has to learn? [....]



Is it possible the current government has more experience with ethics than the previous government? Perhaps with doing what is right rather than mouthing platitudes, Joe? Does anyone remember Joe's "broader political tradition"--Would that be pettiness, Joe, when conservatives actually want a party that represents their views? Does anyone remember, particularly, Joe's demonstration of knowing about the world? Remember his trip to Israel and moving the Canadian embassy? Then, of course, there is knowing about the world ... sophisticated in the Maurice Strong mould ... or in the mould of Stephen Lewis-UN worldly sophisticate-preacher-AIDS-victimology-appointed to the UN-travel on other people's money to the better hotels of the world on leftist speaking engagements schtick ... and by the way, Canadians owe everybody except their own. ... Just what is Joe doing now? Besides trying to undermine this government, that is. How very petty. What appointment has he received ... perhaps from Chretien or Martin? Back to Joe Clark.


It's an interesting parallel because we came from really different places. I came from a much broader political tradition, and we had a lot of people who had been involved in foreign policy quite actively before. Not as ministers or members of the government, but in very active ways. They knew about the world. We had a party that had a strong tradition. [Former Prime Minister John] Diefenbaker's activism on issues that we later followed gave us that advantage. [Stephen Harper's government] didn't have that advantage because they come from a different background. [....]


How revealing ... of Joe Clark.

Yes, Joe, we come from different places. We are Conservatives and conservative. You, on the other hand, slide into bed with the Liberals very easily. Telling your followers to vote Liberal rather than for Stephen Harper and the Conservative Party of Canada was not your most honourable move, but it places you firmly in the Liberal camp ... not exactly a place some of us would want to be. ...

But keep reading ... Joe, too, has found his metier, it seems.




I am doing a lot of work on Africa, as are a lot of Canadian investors. There is a surprising, substantial amount of Canadian investment in Africa. [....]

... part of what makes it easier for our companies to operate in developing places, part of what makes it easier for our diplomats to get European and Asian audiences, [....]


Africa?

By cracky! Joe has finally arrived! Joe has become a worldly sophisticate, in the usual mould. He must go fishing in the right pools too.




Memory Lane: News Junkie Canada Sept. 2, 2004

newsjunkie
canada.blog
spot.com/2004_09_02_news
junkiecanada_archive.html


Joe Clark? Sleeping with the enemy? September 1, 2004, Bill Rodgers, Ottawa Bureau Chief

www.can
oe.ca/NewsStand/
TorontoSun/News/
2004/09/01/611314.html

A ONE-TIME loyal supporter of Joe Clark is attacking the former PM for "sleeping with the enemy." Newfoundland Tory MP Loyola Hearn, one of the architects of the new Conservative Party, launched his assault after learning Clark flew to Germany and Afghanistan last February on a personal invitation from a Liberal cabinet minister.

Some of the details of the trip were revealed in an access to information request obtained by Sun Media. Hearn says the timing of the trip with former defence minister David Pratt is highly suspect because it came shortly after Clark split from the new Conservative Party and just weeks before he expressed his support for Paul Martin's Liberals. He sat in Parliament as an independent. [This is the real world of politics!]

[. . . . ] The trip took Clark and Pratt to Munich for a conference on defence policy and Kabul where Canada was in command of the allied forces. [. . . . ]

[My Comments] .... What frightens people like Joe Clark is that Canadians might have a choice to vote for real change, to vote for conservative Conservatives.


I think this is important because of what I see happening. Figure it out.


Another link: CIDA and Federal Judicial Affairs

Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs - International Cooperation -- with a CIDA link -- and CIDA: Office for Democratic Governance

www.fja.g
c.ca/Inter_co
op/index_e.html

les.acdi-ci
da.gc.ca/servlet/
JKMSearchControl
ler?desTemplateFile=
ccoFocusSearchEn.ht
m&desClientLocale=
enUS&AppID=
CanadaCorpsEn

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home