September 24, 2006

Sept. 24, 2006: One Smart Chief!

A new native tradition to replace "moaning about traditions and lost land and old treaties" -- for more: A scary native leader -- via He's one Scary Indian, CNEWS forum

www.canoe.ca/mb2/messages/cnewsf/12594.html

www.stevejanke.com/archives/197825.php#more

[Osoyoos Band Chief Clarence Louie] is speaking to a large aboriginal conference and some of the attendees, including a few who hold high office, have straggled in.

[....] “If your life sucks, it's because you suck.”

“Quit your sniffling.”

“Join the real world — go to school or get a job.”

“Get off of welfare. Get off your butt.”

“Our ancestors worked for a living,” he says. “So should you.”

Yeah, my eyes popped open too. There's more:

“The biggest employer,” he says, “shouldn't be the band office.”

He also says the time has come to “get over it.”


Comment from swoopnhuck: "Ever hear of the term "breaking the mold"? This native Indian leader is trying to do just that. He's trying to get people to stop "being victims" and start taking responsibility for their future."



Success without a casino or tax-free tobacco? -- "strict rules guard against the kind of nepotism that is common on Indian reserves", posted by casper35

www.stevejanke.com/archives/197825.php#more

Since 1985, when first becoming Chief of the Osoyoos Indian Band in British Columbia, Clarence Louis has consistently emphasized economic development as the fundamental method for improving his people's standard of living. .... a multi-faceted corporation that owns and manages numerous successful businesses. .... socio-economic development .... virtually zero unemployment. The band continues to increase its revenue each year and decrease its need for social assistance. Chief Louis created and manages eight businesses, including [....]

His council recently decided to install clocks at the band council and OIBDC offices to curtail truancy, and strict rules guard against the kind of nepotism that is common on Indian reserves where sisters supervise brothers and the chief hires his wife to do the books. .... business isn't about race - it's about expertise. "There's a group of natives that feels entitled, and that needs to be changed to a culture of performance," he says. "You don't hand over the keys to a multi-million-dollar business to someone who hasn't earned it. That's a recipe for bankruptcy."


One smart chief!

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home